Satellite data shows hijacked Malaysian plane was last seen flying towards Pakistan

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Investigators say the missing Malaysia Airlines jet was hijacked, steered off-course and could have reached Pakistan. A Malaysian government official said people with significant flying experience could have turned off the flight’s communication devices. 

The representative said that hijacking theory was now ‘conclusive’, and, as a result, police have raided the luxury homes of both the captain (right) and the co-pilot (left)

The search operation has now been focused on two ‘corridors’, one which extends from  north west from Thailand to the Kazakstan-Turkmenistan border and the other which opens out into the southern Indian Ocean. Continue…

 

The gates outside the home of co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid which has been searched by police

 

Cuntries in the plane’s potential flightpath have now joined a huge diplomatic effort to locate the missing passengers, but China described the revelation as ‘painfully belated’. 
While Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak refused to confirm that flight MH370 was taken over, he admitted ‘deliberate action’ on board the plane resulted in it changing course and losing connection with ground crews.

The plane’s communication system was switched off as it headed west over the Malaysian seaboard and could have flown for another seven hours on its fuel reserves. 

It is not yet clear where the plane could have been  taken, however Mr Razak said the most recent satellite data suggests the plane could have headed to one of two possible flight corridors.
Countries in the plane’s potential flightpath have now joined a huge diplomatic effort to locate the missing passengers, but China described the revelation as ‘painfully belated’. 

While Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak refused to confirm that flight MH370 was taken over, he admitted ‘deliberate action’ on board the plane resulted in it changing course and losing connection with ground crews.

The plane’s communication system was switched off as it headed west over the Malaysian seaboard and could have flown for another seven hours on its fuel reserves.

It is not yet clear where the plane was taken, however Mr Razak said the most recent satellite data suggests the plane could have headed to one of two possible flight corridors.
 
The last radar contact was made at 8.11am on March 8 along one of the corridors, seven hours and 31 minutes after take off, but the plane could have deviated further from these points.
U.S. investigators have not ruled out the possibility that the passengers are being held at an unknown location and suggest that faint ‘pings’ were being transmitted for several hours after the flight lost contact with the ground. 

NASA has also joined the international search operation, analysing satellite data and images that have already been gathered. 

Malaysian authorities and others are urgently investigating the two pilots and 10 crew members, along with the 227 passengers on board.

 
Source: Daily Mail UK
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